In just two weeks the Chincoteague Volunteer Fire Department’s annual carnival will culminate in the world famous swimming of the horses.  Firemen will become “saltwater cowboys” and drive a herd of wild horses across a narrow channel from Assateague Island to Chincoteague Island and auction off the foals to raise money to support the fire department.  This event was made famous by Marguerite Henry whose 1947 book, Misty of Chincoteague, describes the pony swim and remains a favorite of children today.

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Marguerite Henry and Misty.  From Wikipedia.

I’ve seen the swim covered on the news and I’ve visited the horses at Assateague Island but I’ve never been to see the pony swim.  I wanted to find out more about this interesting event and the herd of horses that lives at the beach.  The Library yielded up several books on the topic.  Most helpful were, Wild Horses of the Dunes by Rich Pomerantz (2004), and Hoofprints in the Sand: Wild Horses of the Atlantic Coast by Bonnie S. Urquhart (2002).  For this week’s blog I thought I’d share some of what I learned.

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Postcard depicting one legend of how horses arrived on the barrier islands.  From The Chincoteague Ponies

Assateague and Chincoteague Islands are part of a long chain of barrier islands that stretches along most of the eastern shore of the United States.  These narrow islands have sandy beaches on their ocean side, and piney forest and marshlands on the side facing the mainland.  Although horses are not native to Assateague Island, they have been there since at least the 17th century.  How they got there is a bit of a mystery.  There are several romantic tales involving herds of pirate’s horses, or horses that survived shipwrecks just off shore and swam to the island, but the more likely solution has to do with tax evasion.  In Colonial times the English levied a tax on fences.  In order to avoid this tax, people moved their herds of horses, cattle, sheep, and even chickens, over to barrier islands like Assateague.  Here the animals had natural “fences,” and were free from both predators and the tax man.  Today there are feral descendants of these hidden herds on many of the barrier islands off the Atlantic coast.

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Horses on Assateague.  From Wild Horses of the Dunes by Rich Pomerantz (2004).  National Sporting Library & Museum, the gift of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Assateague Island is divided in half by the state line between Maryland and Virginia.  A fence marks the border and separates the horses into two herds.  The northern Maryland half is a National Seashore and State Park and is maintained by the National Park Service.  The horses here are generally left to their own devices, aside from a birth control system administered by dart.  It is easy to visit and see the horses here and one can even camp among the dunes.

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Map of Assateague Island.  Chincoteague Island is the island between the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge and the mainland of Virginia.  The horses swim across the narrow channel at the southern end.  From Pryor Wild.

The southern half in Virginia forms The Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, and is run by the United States Fish & Wildlife Service.  It is a frequent stop for migrating birds and to protect the habitat necessary for the birds, the horse herds are restricted to certain areas.  This makes them somewhat more difficult to view than those on the Maryland side.  The Virginia horses are owned by The Chincoteague Volunteer Fire Department, Pony Committee, which actively cares for the herd.

Although animal penning and swimming has been going on at Assateague as long as people have kept animals there, it wasn’t until 1925 that the people of Chincoteague, searching for a way to raise money for their new volunteer fire department, hit upon the idea of adding a pony penning and auction to their annual fund raising carnival.  Today this event is world famous and thousands of spectators attend, hoping to get a good view of the horses as they make the swim across from Assateague Island to Chincoteague Island.

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Rounding up the horses.  From Wild Horses of the Dunes by Rich Pomerantz (2004).  National Sporting Library & Museum, the gift of The Chronicle of the Horse.

The process begins several days before the swim.  Members of the Chincoteague Volunteer Fire Department trade in their fireman’s helmets and hoses, for cowboy hats and bull whips.  They begin at the northern edge of the refuge and slowly drive the horses south where they are penned together in a large corral.  Each horse is checked by a vet and on Wednesday, after a day or two of rest, the entire herd, excepting pregnant mares, the very old or very young, and any sick animals, is swum across the channel to Chincoteague.  It has become quite the media circus and the horses’ route must be carefully protected from fascinated tourists.

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The horses swimming to Chincoteague.  From Chincoteague Ponies.

Once across the channel the horses rest and then are herded down the street to the auction pen at the carnival grounds.  The auction of the year’s foals takes place on Thursday.  Each year between 50 and 70 foals are auctioned off both to raise money for the fire department, and to keep the population of the herd under control.  In recent years, the average price of an Assateague pony has been about $2500.  In addition to bidding for purchase, visitors can also bid on “buyback” ponies.  These are auctioned with the stipulation that they will be donated back to the Fire Company and returned to Assateague Island to join the herd.  People that win a buyback pony also win the right to name the pony.

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Horses after the swim, parading through town on the way to the carnival grounds.  From Chincoteague Ponies.

The day following the auction the remaining horses are swum back across the channel and are released for another year.  They quickly form up in their family bands and disappear into the dunes, marshes, and piney forests.

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Horses on Assateague.  From Wild Horses of the Dunes by Rich Pomerantz (2004).  National Sporting Library & Museum, the gift of The Chronicle of the Horse.

If you’re interested in getting more detailed information I encourage you to stop by the Library and take a look at our books on the topic.  We have information not only on the Assateague horses but on a variety of feral horse populations.  If you’re in the area and would like information about attending the carnival, the swim, or the auction, you can view the guide to the 2018 event here.


Erica Libhart has served as the Mars Technical Services Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2016. The focus of her position is collection services, working to increase accessibility to NSLM’s collection of books, periodicals, and archival materials. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact Erica by e-mail

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In June, NSLM won an award! We won the Business Equine-Related Custom Publication (Print) category of the Equine Media Awards for the exhibition catalog for The Horse in Ancient Greek Art. The catalog, which features scholarly essays and beautiful images from the exhibition, is available for purchase through NSLM’s online gift shop. The exhibition is still on view at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, but it closes July 8, so take advantage of this last chance to see it!

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NSLM’s 2017 Equine Media Awards winner’s plaque, with certificate for NSLM Curator Nicole Stribling for her efforts on the publication.

The Equine Media Awards are part of the annual conference for American Horse Publications, an organizations dedicated to excellence in equestrian publications. The conference, held each summer, is a great opportunity for networking and idea-sharing. NSLM has been a non-profit member of AHP for years. The Equine Media Awards are the highlight of each conference, with dozens of categories for competition. See the entire award winners list here.

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AHP’s annual conference is a great place to swap ideas and get to know the hard-working folks who produce the equestrian magazines and websites we know and love

On the Library side, we were thrilled to announce that we have received a grant to begin work on one of our long-range goals: digitizing rare books from the NSLM collection. Digitization is a huge avenue toward greater accessibility to the collection and it also reduces wear on titles in the Library.

Digitization work has already been done in small portions. Several years ago, the Library digitized its microfilm collection. The first book to be digitized was last week, as our neighbors at Paratext dropped by to take images of the Index to Engravings in the Sporting Magazine by Sir Walter Gilbey.

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Paratext Editor Grayson Van Beuren creating digital photos of a rare book in the NSLM Main Reading Room. Paratext is an independent library information and research company based in Middleburg.

The grant will go toward a more comprehensive project that includes the purchase of rare book scanning equipment and the development of an online platform to allow researchers to read the digital books.


Wedding Photography by Spiering Photography

John Connolly has served as the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2014. He is responsible for the care of the Library collections, including books, magazines, photographs, diaries, letters, and much more. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact John by e-mail 

Sir Alfred Munnings was a famous and successful painter and President of the Royal Academy of Arts, but for a time his wife Violet’s pet Pekingese, Black Knight, was equally famous.  Violet took Black Knight with her everywhere and frequently concealed him in a specially designed handbag with a “window” in the end through which he could observe the goings on.

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“The most famous dog in the world.”  Black Knight in his handbag.  Photo courtesy of The Munnings Art Museum. 

He attended exhibition openings, horse shows, and horse races.  In his black velvet evening bag he was smuggled into formal dinners and receptions.  Eventually the press discovered him and after a photo of Black Knight at a reception at the Prime Minister’s residence made the papers, the public became a bit obsessed with the small black dog.

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“Sir Anthony Eden, myself, and Violet Munnings at a party at the P. Minister’s 10 Downing Street, 1949.”  Photo Courtesy of The Munnings Art Museum.

Readers were able to keep abreast of all of Black Knight’s activities as the newspapers regularly reported on the events he attended, what he dined upon, the people he met, and his tips on the outcomes of horse races.  Violet collected the newspaper articles about him, as well as his photos, in a scrapbook.  Most of the photos in this post are from Black Knight’s scrapbook courtesy of The Munnings Museum which was kind enough to share them.

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A collage of newspaper clippings about Black Knight.  Photo from the back dust jacket of Diary of a Freeman.  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.

His popularity was such that he published an autobiography in which he described his adventures for his fans.  He talks about his activities at home, such as riding the mare Chena, or cuddling on the longest sofa in the library, his favorite room in the house.

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A. J. Munnings, Violet Munnings, and Black Knight.  Photo courtesy of The Munnings Art Museum.

Black Knight’s social calendar was rather full.  He attended many parties and receptions at St. James Palace and Buckingham Palace.  Five different Lords Mayor of London welcomed him as a guest that their banquets, and he was even made an honorary Freeman of the City of London.

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Violet and Black Knight looking through his scrapbook.  Photo courtesy of The Munnings Art Museum.

He was presented to the Queen at the Royal Garden Party, attended the King and Queen’s silver anniversary party at Buckingham Palace, and even attended Princess Elizabeth’s wedding.  According to Black Knight’s account of the event, he stowed away in Violet’s hand muff and was not discovered until she was seated in the Abbey!

He enjoyed attending horse races and would indicate his picks for the winners by barking at them.  He even had his own account with a bookmaker where Violet placed his bets for him.  Black Knight accompanied Violet everywhere for ten years until his death in 1955.  After his death she refused to be parted from him and had him stuffed.

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Black Knight today, on his cushion in Violet’s room.  Photo courtesy of The Munnings Art Museum.

And so he continued accompany her for years afterwards.  Today he resides on a cushion in her room, at the house they lived in, which is now the Munnings Art Museum.

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The Munnings residence, Castle House, now The Munnings Art Museum in Dedham, England.  Photo from the European Museums Network.

If you’d like to read about Black Knight’s exploits and adventures in his own words, his autobiography, The Diary of a Freeman, is available the Main Reading Room here at the Library.  It is quite delightful to read about events from his point of view.

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Black Knight recreating his pose for the portrait that was used as the cover of his book, Diary of a Freeman.  Photo courtesy of The Munnings Art Museum.

The Library also holds numerous books about Sir Alfred Munnings, including his autobiography, which shows the events portrayed in Black Knight’s book from another, taller,  point of view.


Erica Libhart has served as the Mars Technical Services Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2016. The focus of her position is collection services, working to increase accessibility to NSLM’s collection of books, periodicals, and archival materials. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact Erica by e-mail

 

Hound shows have been part of the American sporting landscape for decades, and we’re privileged in Virginia to have one of the largest shows in the world. The Virginia Foxhound Club hosts the Virginia Foxhound Show every spring, barely 30 minutes drive from NSLM.

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The Virginia Hound Show was founded in 1934 by William Du Pont, Jr., president of the now-defunct American Foxhound Club, by request of his sister, Marion Du Pont Scott.

In 1934, William duPont, Jr., president of the now-defunct American Foxhound Club (and great-grandson of the founder of the duPont Company), was asked by his sister, Marion duPont Scott (wife of actor Randolph Scott), to seek the sanctioning of a hound show in Virginia. Mrs. Scott offered her Montpelier estate (built by President James Madison) as a venue, and the show, which offered a bench show as well as field trial classes for mostly American hounds, ran for seven years under the auspices of the American Foxhound Club until the outbreak of World War II.

American Foxhound Club History, by Norman Fine

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While the Virginia Hound Show is one of the largest shows in the United States, the Bryn Mawr Hound Show is the oldest, founded in 1914.

The Bryn Mawr Hound Show was started in September, 1914 by John Valentine, Plunket Stewart and J. Stanley Reeve. Local Masters of Hounds were contacted and, upon receiving approval and support, officers were elected and committees appointed. Apparently, the first show was a great success, as 21 of the foremost packs in America showed hounds.

Bryn Mawr Hound Show History, excerpted from History of the Bryn Mawr Hound Show 1914-1989 by C. Barton Higham

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Together these are two of the most prestigious hound shows in the United States. At the shows, hounds are judged on conformation, suitability, and temperament, individually and in packs. Many prizes from both shows have been won by the Orange County Hounds, one of our local hunts, and are on display in the Library’s Main Reading Room and Founders’ Room.

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This year, Orange County was hugely successful at both shows, winning 12 classes at the Virginia Foxhound Show and 11 classes at Bryn Mawr. The star at both shows was Kermit, a hound who won Champion American Foxhound, Grand Champion Foxhound, and Best in Show at Bryn Mawr as well as Best American Stallion Hound, Champion American Dog Hound, and Champion American Foxhound of the Show at the Virginia Hound Show.

If you’re in the area, make sure to stop by the Library and enjoy the trophies on display!


Wedding Photography by Spiering Photography

John Connolly has served as the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2014. He is responsible for the care of the Library collections, including books, magazines, photographs, diaries, letters, and much more. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact John by e-mail 

How do museums care for art collections?

In the 1983 film “Sesame Street at the Metropolitan Museum of Art,” Cookie Monster has to resist eating delicious looking pictures. [Image: http://muppet.wikia.com/wiki/Don%27t_Eat_the_Pictures] (c) Sesame Workshop
Museum professionals work hard behind-the-scenes to make sure unique collections and cultural heritage survives for future generations to enjoy. The ways in which we store, handle, and light art objects are key to preventing damage and slowing deterioration over time. The professional term is preventative conservation, and it is the unsung hero of museum collections care.

You may have noticed that most museums are extremely vigilant about preventing visitors from touching the artwork.

Dirt and oils from hands can add up to damage over time. Cracking in painted surfaces is inevitable, as the different natural and man-made materials that make up canvas and paint expand and contract over time. But, pressure – from a hand or pointing finger, for instance – can result in extensive cracks that may not show up until later.

Details from: John Frederick Herring, Sr., The Start of the Derby, 1845, oil on canvas, 28 x 48 inches, Bequest of Elizabeth D. Clark, 2017
Concentric circles or bullseye cracks can develop from pressure (like a finger poke) that has been applied to a painting canvas.

And a careless gesture too close to a painting could result in more immediate (and very expensive) damage – like this $40-million Dollar Elbow.

Physical damage can also be caused by the environment. If you have ever hung a photograph in your home where it is hit by direct sunlight, you may have made the sad discovery that your picture has started to fade away. Works on paper – such as pencil, ink, watercolor, and especially photographs – are particularly sensitive to light damage. In the museum we monitor light levels carefully and use window coverings to filter out harmful UV light from the outside.

Routine cleaning and treatments also help prevent damage. We enlist professional conservators to combine science and chemistry with art to do so.

Sculpture conservator Andrew Baxter prepares wax to protect the bronze sculpture of a filly, Darn That Itch by Jean Clagett, on the NSLM campus.
Tools of the trade: The sculpture conservator uses wax tinted with different types of pigments to create a protective layer over the bronze.
A pre-treatment photo of the NSLM’s Sea Hero statue. Note the greenish hue, particularly on the base.
After annual cleaning and re-waxing, the green discoloration is gone and rain water beads and pools on the base of the bronze.

To learn more about the treatment of outdoor bronze sculptures and our Sea Hero statue, read this past blog post, Bath Time for Bronze Horses.

When damage does occur, whether naturally or by accident, conservators also help us repair and restore works of art. A large, four-paneled, 18th century sporting screen in the permanent collection is currently undergoing treatment by a conservator. In the photos below, you can see the progress so far. The left photo was taken before any cleaning or treatment. The right photo was taken during the treatment process after yellowed varnish and old discolored repairs have been removed. The bright white areas are filled-in repairs that will eventually be repainted.

Details from: (after) James Seymour, Four-paneled Sporting Screen, mid-18th/19th century, hand-colored engravings mounted on canvas, and oil on canvas mounted on a wooden frame, each panel 81 ½ x 27 inches, Bequest of Sonia Phipps Seherr-Thoss, 2006
On the left, photos taken before treatment show cloudy, yellowed varnish and old, discolored past repairs. On the right, photos taken during treatment show brighter colors and details. The areas of bright white are newly made repairs to old damage.

Once cleaning is complete and all repairs have been finished, the screen will be re-coated with a thin layer of protective varnish and can then be put back on view in the galleries.

It takes consistent care to keep these objects looking their best. If you want to help support the ongoing conservation efforts here at the NSLM, please consider making a donation!

The NSLM Library holds more than a few game books and hunt diaries.  Game books typically tally up the bag for a given day’s hunting while hunt diaries give more detailed information about the participants, the weather, and any interesting events that took place during the hunt.  I recently discovered that the Library also holds a copy of the charming fishing diary of a woman named Muriel Foster.

The diary records over 30 years of Muriel’s fishing activities, and as one might expect, details when and where she fished, her catch, and the flies she used.  What makes the diary unique are the lavish illustrations that she added to embellish it.  The diary would become a family heirloom and it is her great-niece that decided to have it published in 1980.

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Muriel Foster’s Fishing Diary, (Muriel Foster, 1980).  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.

Muriel was born in in 1884 in Surrey, England.  She was a tomboy and enjoyed many of the activities her brothers participated in, including fencing and fishing.  Demonstrating artistic ability, she was enrolled in the Slade School of Art, where she studied under Henry Tonks.  While Muriel did well and even exhibited a drawing at the Royal Academy, she was not destined to become a professional artist.  Unmarried in her mid-forties she established her own household in a home called Ivy Cottage, in Wiltshire.  Here she spent the rest of her life pursuing her interests in drawing, painting, gardening, and fishing, and here she welcomed her many nieces and nephews.

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Ivy Cottage.  Muriel Foster’s Fishing Diary, (Muriel Foster, 1980).  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.

The illustrations on the pages of her fishing diary pull the viewer into Muriel’s experience.   She shows us not only the fish and the flies she used to catch them…

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Assorted flies and a fish.  Muriel Foster’s Fishing Diary, (Muriel Foster, 1980).  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.
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Fish.  Muriel Foster’s Fishing Diary, (Muriel Foster, 1980).  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.

but also the other animals she encountered while fishing…

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Seal off the Islands, and “Luna.”  Muriel Foster’s Fishing Diary, (Muriel Foster, 1980).  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.
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Slavonian Grebes on Loch Farralin.  Muriel Foster’s Fishing Diary, (Muriel Foster, 1980).  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.

the landscapes that surrounded her as she fished…

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The river at Hildersham.  Muriel Foster’s Fishing Diary, (Muriel Foster, 1980).  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.
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Lough Conn, pontoon bridge.  Muriel Foster’s Fishing Diary, (Muriel Foster, 1980).  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.

and the people that sometimes joined her on her outings.

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Colin with Bob, Smoke, Ranger and Jandoc.  Muriel Foster’s Fishing Diary, (Muriel Foster, 1980).  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.
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Hector.  Muriel Foster’s Fishing Diary, (Muriel Foster, 1980).  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.

Her drawings evoke the full experience of fishing, not simply the challenge of hauling in a trout or salmon, but also the enjoyment of spending time out of doors and a love of the countryside.  I imagine her spending cold winter nights illustrating the diary with the same calm and patience required for fishing.  Her paintings and drawings allowing her to relive the days on the river or loch until her next outing.

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The end of the day.  Muriel Foster’s Fishing Diary, (Muriel Foster, 1980).  The gift of John H. and Martha Daniels.

Perhaps some of the fishers reading this will be inspired to create a similar record of their adventures.  I’ve only included a few photos of the diary here.  If you’d like to get a closer look just let us know you’re coming and we’ll be happy to get it out for you.


Erica Libhart has served as the Mars Technical Services Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2016. The focus of her position is collection services, working to increase accessibility to NSLM’s collection of books, periodicals, and archival materials. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact Erica by e-mail

There are five striking oils depicting foxhunting painted entirely in black and white in the National Sporting Library & Museum’s permanent collection. The technique is called en grisaille (pronounced “ohnˈ griˈzɑ yə”), a French term meaning in gray tones. Created with mixtures of black and white pigments, these types of paintings date back to the Middle Ages.

George Wright (English, 1860-1942), A Treed Fox, oil on canvas, en grisaille, 17 x 25 inches, Gift of Mrs. Felicia Warburg Rogan, 2008

Created by George Wright (1860-1942), the paintings were among fifteen important British sporting artworks donated to the NSLM by Felicia Warburg Rogan in 2008. Surprisingly little is known about Wright’s life and teaching. The artist, however, left behind a considerable body of work and was acknowledged as one of the top sporting artists of his day by circa 1900.

Many of Wright’s en grisaille subjects are believed to have been produced early in his career for reproduction as illustrations. Working in gray tones was a practical choice for these types of works. There was no need to use expensive color pigments if they were not intended to be seen. Painting in grayscale also allowed for better control of contrasts, shades, and tones. As an example, NSLM has a sixth painting by George Wright done in color that is an almost identical scene to the monochromatic A Treed Fox. This allows the opportunity to make a direct comparison of Wright’s color and black and white techniques.

George Wright (English, 1860-1942), A Treed Fox, oil on canvas, 13 1/2 x 20 inches, Gift of Mrs. Felicia Warburg Rogan, 2008
Left: Detail of Treed Fox, color version; Center: Detail of Treed Fox, color version converted to grayscale; Right: Detail of Treed Fox, en grisaille painting

On the left is a detail of the color painting; in the center is the color version converted to grayscale; and on the right is the actual black and white work. The composition in color is more painterly with a nuanced palette and brushstrokes. Reproduced in black and white though, it becomes muddy, and the details are difficult to see. Where the reproduction fails, the painting on the right succeeds; it has a refined illustrative quality with crisper lines and higher contrasts.

The obvious and purposeful difference between the way Wright painted the two versions reinforces the idea that the en grisaille works were intended for reproduction. To-date NSLM’s compositions have not been found reproduced, but they tell stories in their own right. Two are the same size and bear inscriptions on the bottom left corner, “In at the Death” and “The Kennels.”

George Wright (English, 1860-1942), In at the Death, oil on canvas, en grisaille, 18 x 27 inches, Gift of Mrs. Felicia Warburg Rogan, 2008

In the first, the huntsman presents the brush (fox’s tail) to the lady wearing a bowler hat and riding aside. The recipient of the trophy was chosen by the Master of Foxhounds to reward participants who were skilled riders and kept at the head of the hunt field. The tradition of presenting the fox mask and brush has today become censured, but it is worthy to note that it was done with a sense of deference to the fox.

“Poor Reynard [“reynard” is French for “fox”], his day is done! No more wild raids on the sleeping countryside; no more slaughter in hen house or rabbit warren…Off from your horse, Mr. Huntsman, for the trophies of so gallant a beast are worth the saving,” wrote B. Fletcher Robinson in Sporting Pictures to describe a painting titled Killed in the Quarry by George Wright. (This 1902 folio sized art book held in the NSLM’s F. Ambrose Clark Rare Book Room was published in celebration of English country sports with works “reproduced in colour by the newest and most perfect process of chromo-lithography.”)

George Wright (English, 1860-1942), At the Kennels, oil on canvas, en grisaille, 18 x 27 inches, Gift of Mrs. Felicia Warburg Rogan, 2008

The second en grisaille painting in the NSLM’s pair, “At The Kennels,shows the hounds obediently following the huntsman to the kennel gate, as the Master looks on and a groom has charge of the horses. The likeness of the huntsman is similar to the one depicted in The Treed Fox discussed earlier and two other en grisaille works in NSLM’s holdings. These all show instances in which the fox is just out of reach of the hound pack.

George Wright (English, 1860-1942), Out of Reach, A Fox at Bay on a High Wall, c. 1884, oil on canvas, en grisaille, 16 x 24 inches, Gift of Mrs. Felicia Warburg Rogan, 2008
George Wright (English, 1860-1942), Closing In, c. 1884, oil on canvas, en grisaille, 16 x 24 inches, Gift of Mrs. Felicia Warburg Rogan, 2008

Wright is believed to have hunted with the Surrey and Old Burstow, and it is quite evident from his works that he had an intimate understanding of foxhunting and its human, equine, and canine participants. Whether or not he intended for the figures to be likenesses of recognizable individuals is unknown. He included them in other hunt scenes over time. The allure of George Wright’s en grisaille compositions evoke nostalgia for a bygone era and a sport that at the same time remains universal and timeless for those who still participate in it today.


pfeifferClaudia Pfeiffer has been the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Curator of Art at the National Sporting Library & Museum since the position was underwritten by the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Foundation in 2012. Her primary focus is the research, design, interpretation, writing, and installation of exhibitions. E-mail Claudia at cpfeiffer@nationalsporting.org