The year before last, one of our books up for repair from our Book Adoption Program was written by John Henry Walsh (1810-1888), who wrote under the pseudonym “Stonehenge.” The book, called British Rural Sports, was adopted for restoration by John and Kelly Johnson.

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John Henry Walsh, “Stonehenge,” from British Rural Sports, 1877, National Sporting Library & Museum.

British Rural Sports is an all-in-one volume on 19th Century country sport, showing off Walsh’s command of sporting topics with almost 1,000 pages of content on foxhunting, steeplechase, fly fishing, all variety of shooting and hunting, dog breeds, canine and equine anatomy, and more.

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Toy Terrier and Italian Greyhound, from British Rural Sports, 1877, National Sporting Library & Museum.

Walsh got his start as a surgeon but gravitated to sporting life. He had an interest in every imaginable field sport: angling, riding to hounds, wing shooting, yachting, and more. He was particularly attached to the breeding of dogs and to the development of sporting firearms. He quickly established himself as an expert sporting author, publishing a book on greyhound breeding in 1853 and becoming a regular contributor of articles to periodicals that covered field sports.

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Hunting, from British Rural Sports, 1877, National Sporting Library & Museum.

In 1857, Walsh became editor of The Field, a prominent sporting magazine. He continued his career as a noteworthy sporting author, penning volumes on stabling horses, caring for the health of dogs, and on sporting shotguns and rifles.

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Truffle Dog, from British Rural Sports, 1877, National Sporting Library & Museum.

Walsh instigated a series of field trials for sporting firearms, testing the abilities of various gun designs and varieties of gunpowder. Walsh was also associated with the Kennel Club, working to organize and promote early dog shows. He rode to hounds, trained pointers and setters, and is also reported to have trained hawks. He died in 1888 at 77 years old.


Wedding Photography by Spiering Photography

John Connolly has served as the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2014. He is responsible for the care of the Library collections, including books, magazines, photographs, diaries, letters, and much more. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact John by e-mail 

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When looking to identify a book as one’s own, the discerning bibliophile will opt for a book plate. Book plates range from lighthearted and fanciful to historic and dignified.

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Book plate including family arms of the Fifth Earl of Lonsdale.

Here at NSLM, we have thousands of books with the plates of collectors past. Many enshrine the book owner’s love of turf and field sports.

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Book Plate of Harry Worcester Smith.

Book plates have been considered collectible items since the 1950s, with whole organizations devoted to the collecting of plates. We recently came across a collection of draft book plate designs by Robert Ball. Ball’s completed book plates are gorgeous, contemplative pieces, and many of the rough drafts in the book are sketched out on wax paper.

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Finalized book plate in memory of Frederick Sprague Barbour for The Norfolk Library.

 

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A copper plate of a draft book plate for Jerome Marks Rich. Mr. Rich rejected this design and the plate was sold in 1970.
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Positive draft book plate for Jerome Marks Rich.
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Robert Ball drafted a book plate for Henry Ford. This pencil sketch is on wax-lined tissue paper.
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A draft book plate for the NSLM? We were surprised to stumble across this piece. To our knowledge, the plate was never completed and NSLM has no books with the plate.

More to come as we see if we can research the history of the NSLM book plate by Robert Ball. It would be wonderful if we could identify a completed version!

Thank you to all our readers for a great 2016! Staff will be out of office next week for holidays, and we’ll update the blog again on our new Tuesday schedule beginning January 3.


Wedding Photography by Spiering Photography

John Connolly has served as the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2014. He is responsible for the care of the Library collections, including books, magazines, photographs, diaries, letters, and much more. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact John by e-mail

Today’s highlight from the Library collection is a scrapbook of lithographed plates by sporting illustrator Henry Alken (1785-1851). Alken was a leading illustrator of sporting topics in England during his lifetime, working in engravings as well as oils and watercolors. This Sporting Scrap Book (published in 1824 by Thomas McLean) features fifty plates that include complete scenes and image collages on many different country sports.

The plates in this scrapbook feature a wide variety of subjects. What might be considered non sequitur today made logical sense in Alken's time: shooting, foxhunting, and riding were all connected as leisure pursuits of the landed classes.
The plates in this scrapbook feature a wide variety of subjects. What might be considered non sequitur today made logical sense in Alken’s time: shooting, foxhunting, and riding were all connected as leisure pursuits of the landed classes.
The Sporting Scrap Book is one of dozens of early and first editions of Alken’s work collected by John Daniels. Today, the book is housed in the F. Ambrose Clark Rare Book Room on the Library’s Lower Level.
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Alken’s work is very flexible; he could be humorous and satirical, but he also possessed the ability to capture subjects seriously as well.
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Very business-like hounds. Many breeds of dogs served specific roles as hunters.
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Look closely! A hare hides in the grass. Other popular quarry for hunters included fox and badger.

If you’d like to learn more about the development of hunting and shooting (and the dogs that made it all possible), don’t miss our ongoing exhibition, “Side-by-Side with Gun & Dog” at the Museum until March 20. Can’t visit us before then? The Side-by-Side catalog is available for purchase now so you can enjoy the artwork from home!