This week is the 98th running of the Middleburg Spring Races. The first race was run in 1911, organized by Daniel C. Sands, MFH of the Middleburg Hunt, and despite a hiatus during World War I, still endures today. The races are run at Glenwood Park here in Middleburg, which Sands donated in 1963 to preserve the open spaces required for equestrian events.

We recently found an image in one of our archive collections of the Middleburg Spring Races in 1938. Glenwood Park looks almost exactly the same today as it did back then, even down to the areas where tailgates and general admission spectators are located. Click here to get a close up view of the 1938 races!

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Middleburg Spring Races, 1938. Photograph by Walter B. Lane. National Sporting Library & Museum, Gerald B. Webb, Jr. Archive.

Wedding Photography by Spiering Photography

John Connolly has served as the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2014. He is responsible for the care of the Library collections, including books, magazines, photographs, diaries, letters, and much more. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact John by e-mail

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A few weeks ago, some casual browsing of the internet turned up a fascinating connection for NSLM’s staff members. We found that Frances Benjamin Johnston visited Middleburg in the 1930s to photograph the town’s historic buildings. Like so many accidental discoveries, we knew we had to get it onto the blog to share with our readers!

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Johnston, Frances Benjamin, photographer. Frances Benjamin Johnston, full-length portrait, seated in front of fireplace, facing left, holding cigarette in one hand and a beer stein in the other, in her Washington, D.C. studio. Washington D.C, 1896. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/98502934/. (Accessed March 25, 2018.)

Frances Benjamin Johnston (1864-1952) was a hugely influential figure in the history of American photography. Raised in the Washington, D.C. region, Johnston embarked on her photography career when a friend of her family, George Eastman, gave her a camera as a gift. Johnston would go on to become the official White House photographer for five separate presidential administrations before turning her focus to architecture.

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Johnston, Frances Benjamin, photographer. Rogers House, Middleburg, Loudoun County, Virginia. Loudoun County Middleburg Virginia, ca. 1930. [Between and 1939] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/csas200905147/. (Accessed March 25, 2018.)
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Vine Hill today. A large magnolia is growing in the spot where Johnston first photographed the building.

Johnston began to explore photographing architecture in the 1920s, and by the 1930s, she had developed a plan to photograph early structures that were at risk of deterioration or redevelopment. Johnston embarked on what would become the Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South.

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Johnston, Frances Benjamin, photographer. Rogers House, Middleburg, Loudoun County, Virginia. Loudoun County Middleburg Virginia, ca. 1930. [Between and 1939] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/csas200905153/. (Accessed March 25, 2018.)
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In the 1920s and earlier, this was the front door to Vine Hill. By the 1930s, this was used as a side door with the south end doorway serving as the main entrance.

Originally planned to last one year to tour Virginia, the project stretched out over eight years and Johnston visited eight states and traveled thousands of miles. One of her stops was Middleburg, Virginia, where she photographed Vine Hill.

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Johnston, Frances Benjamin, photographer. Rogers House, Middleburg, Loudoun County, Virginia. Loudoun County Middleburg Virginia, ca. 1930. [Between and 1939] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/csas200905148/. (Accessed March 25, 2018.)
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For decades, this south entrance was the main door to Vine Hill. To protect the artwork in the gallery inside, it’s no longer used to enter the building.

Vine Hill was built by in 1804 and was occupied by the Cochran family through the Civil War. Following the war, the house was owned by the Rogers and Noland families before being owned by Fanny Dudley Woodward in trust for her daughter, Katharine “Foffy” Woodward, who was deaf.

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Johnston, Frances Benjamin, photographer. Rogers House, Middleburg, Loudoun County, Virginia. Loudoun County Middleburg Virginia, ca. 1930. [Between and 1939] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/csas200905149/. (Accessed March 25, 2018.)
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The original entry to Vine Hill remains intact with original stairway and banisters. Although the upper level galleries are currently closed as a new exhibition is installed, visitors usually use this staircase to access the upper floor galleries. Sadly, the deer head no longer adorns the landing.

Foffy Woodward owned the house into the 1960s, opening the region’s first antiques shop out of the house. When Johnston visited Middleburg in the 1930s, the house was referred to as the Rogers House, and all her photos are labeled as such.

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Johnston, Frances Benjamin, photographer. Rogers House, Middleburg, Loudoun County, Virginia. Loudoun County Middleburg Virginia, ca. 1930. [Between and 1939] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/csas200905150/. (Accessed March 25, 2018.)
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Today, the sliding doors and nooks next to the fireplace are gone in favor of easy access to the next gallery.

The name “Vine Hill” referred to a time when the Noland family when the house was surrounded by vineyards, and appears to have supplanted “Rogers House” in the 1940s or 1950s.

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Johnston, Frances Benjamin, photographer. Rogers House, Middleburg, Loudoun County, Virginia. Loudoun County Middleburg Virginia, ca. 1930. [Between and 1939] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/csas200905152/. (Accessed March 25, 2018.)
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It’s not unusual today for visitors to the Museum to view works by Michael Lyne, Sir Alfred Munnings, and others… in the rooms filled with over 200 years of history.

Vine Hill was purchased by George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. in 1968 to serve as the offices of The Chronicle of the Horse and the National Sporting Library. The two organizations would share the building for thirty years before new buildings were constructed for each in 1998.

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Johnston, Frances Benjamin, photographer. Rogers House, Middleburg, Loudoun County, Virginia. Loudoun County Middleburg Virginia, ca. 1930. [Between and 1939] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/csas200905154/. (Accessed March 25, 2018.)
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The rooms of Vine Hill now serve as gallery space for the National Sporting Library & Museum. Gallery lighting was installed and exhibitions of paintings and sculptures now occupy these spaces.

In 2010, new gallery space was added to Vine Hill and in 2011, the Museum opened and the National Sporting Library was re-named the National Sporting Library & Museum.


Wedding Photography by Spiering Photography

John Connolly has served as the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2014. He is responsible for the care of the Library collections, including books, magazines, photographs, diaries, letters, and much more. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact John by e-mail

In 1830, a gangling, tall man named William T. Porter came to New York City from the peaceful countryside of rural Vermont. His towering height (six feet, four inches) gave him the nickname “Tall Son of York,” and Porter (1809-1858) was a man with a dream. He had a vision of launching his own newspaper dedicated to sports of all kinds, modeled after the fashionable London newspapers that chronicled the day-by-day activities of popular horse races, prominent fox hunts, and gave advice on raising dogs, fly fishing, shotgunning trips, and even billiards matches.

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Wm. T. Porter, editor of the Spirit of the Times / Pierce. From the collection of Thomas Addis Emmet, 1828–1919, NYPL Digital Gallery. Accessed via Wikimedia Commons.

By 1831, Porter made his dream a reality with the launch of Spirit of the Times. Porter was the owner and editor, and his four brothers were his business partners in the venture. Spirit of the Times grew a large audience in the American southwest, focusing on the active racing scene in the antebellum South. Porter encouraged humorous and satirical entries, and the Spirit played a significant role in popularizing the American tall tale and by 1839, Spirit of the Times was the most popular sporting periodical in the United States. Porter longed to establish a formal stud book for the United States, in similar vein to the General Stud Book in Britain. The goal would not be achieved in his lifetime.

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George Wilkes, Esq., Editor of Wilke’s New York Spirit of the Times. — Photographed by Brady. From Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, April 7, 1860. Accessed via Wikimedia Commons.

The history of Spirit of the Times is fractured and difficult to trace in its earliest roots, but things became complicated in the 1850s. In 1856, Porter sold his ownership of Spirit of the Times to George Wilkes (1817-1885), staying on as editor until his death in 1858. Abraham Dayton, a former employee at Spirit, launched his own rival publication in 1859, called Porter’s Spirit of the Times, creating a confusing rivalry of weekly sporting newspapers with very similar names. After a court case regarding the use of Porter’s name, the original Spirit was re-christened Wilkes’ Spirit of the Times.

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Masthead of Wilkes’ Spirit of the Times, January 9, 1864. National Sporting Library & Museum.

The Civil War tore apart American society, including the sporting and publishing world. Porter’s Spirit of the Times struggled through the war, andwas eventually reunified as Spirit of the Times under Wilkes, who served as editor and publisher until his death in 1885. However, as the war raged, another luminary of sporting newspaper history was rising to military prominence.

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Masthead of Turf, Field and Farm, February 18, 1876. National Sporting Library & Museum.

Sanders D. Bruce (1825-1902), originally from Lexington, Kentucky, had joined his state’s militia as a captain in 1859, following John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry. When the Civil War began, Bruce chose to fight for the Union, taking a promotion to Colonel in the 4th Division of the Army of the Ohio. The highlight of Col. Sanders Bruce’s military career was leading his brigade in the Battle of Shiloh, but he was obliged to resign his commission in 1864 due to heart trouble.

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The Battle of Shiloh, Thure de Thulstrup, 1888. Restoration by Adam Cuerden. Accessed via Wikimedia Commons. The Battle of Shiloh was the highlight of Col. Sanders Bruce’s military career.

Following the war, Bruce relocated to New York and launched his own sporting newspaper called Turf, Field and Farm. The new paper received an instant boost by purchasing much of its infrastructure and equipment from Spirit of the Times, which was struggling through reduced wartime readership. The two papers vied with each other for decades, and within a few years of the war, Turf, Field and Farm and Spirit of the Times made up two of New York’s three most popular newspapers.

Bruce would go on to write extensively on horse breeding, finally fulfilling William Porter’s dream with his production of the American Stud Book in 1873.


Wedding Photography by Spiering Photography

John Connolly has served as the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2014. He is responsible for the care of the Library collections, including books, magazines, photographs, diaries, letters, and much more. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact John by e-mail

One hundred years ago, the rural Virginia community in western Loudoun and northern Fauquier counties was undergoing a transformation. The interwar period was a period of renaissance for foxhunting and equestrian sport, both in the United Kingdom and the United States. From Leesburg to Warrenton and anchored in Middleburg, a new community was evolving: Virginia’s Hunt Country.

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“Leesburg, 1922.” National Sporting Library & Museum, Archives Collection, MC0033, “Middleburg-Leesburg Photograph Album.”

The NSLM mission lists three functions: to preserve, promote, and share the contents of our collections and the subjects contained in them. None of these functions is truly independent of one another, but a great deal of emphasis is placed on preservation when it comes to the Library’s collections. A fantastic example of why we emphasize the importance of preservation is a photograph album in the Library’s archival collections.

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“Middleburg Hunt Cup, 1923 — Dr. Burke won.” National Sporting Library & Museum, Archives Collection, MC0033, “Middleburg-Leesburg Photograph Album.”

Almost every photo in the album is unidentified. Most of them are fading away. Aside from balancing contrast to enhance visibility, the images in this blog post are unaltered snapshots of the album’s contents.

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Unidentified Photo. National Sporting Library & Museum, Archives Collection, MC0033, “Middleburg-Leesburg Photograph Album.”

Photos are decidedly horsey, and show an enthusiastic sporting community, and snapshots of everyday life. We have no idea who took or collected the photos, but most images are in or around Middleburg in the 1920s.

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“Springfield, 1911.” National Sporting Library & Museum, Archives Collection, MC0033, “Middleburg-Leesburg Photograph Album.”

Identification for albums like this can be tricky. Most all of the images are pasted directly to the album paper, and it’s impossible to remove the prints without destroying them.

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Unidentified Photo. National Sporting Library & Museum, Archives Collection, MC0033, “Middleburg-Leesburg Photograph Album.”

On close inspection, it appears the rider is wearing jodhpurs, a short-sleeved shirt, and a necktie. Competition attendees drove out in their Model T Fords, lined up in the background.

The pressure to preserve is immense with a collection like the NSLM’s. As objects deteriorate, unique glimpses at history could be lost.

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Unidentified Photo. National Sporting Library & Museum, Archives Collection, MC0033, “Middleburg-Leesburg Photograph Album.”

An image with advanced fading: an unidentified rider wearing a dapper straw hat.

The photographs in this album are only a fraction of the total photographic images in the NSLM collection. The best hope to preserve these images would be scanning or high-resolution photography before the originals deteriorate. This album is one of hundreds of objects in the NSLM collection awaiting digital preservation. We’re already making plans for securing the resources and equipment to preserve these kinds of objects so they can be enjoyed online.

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Unidentified Photo. National Sporting Library & Museum, Archives Collection, MC0033, “Middleburg-Leesburg Photograph Album.”

A pony race? Mostly boys, but there appear to be two young girls lined up as well. Photo discoloration has crept into the edges of the photo.

Overall, this mysterious album contains dozens of unidentified photographs. Of the few with identification, the oldest photo dates to 1911, with most images likely from the 1920s. This was a period of growth for Middleburg and its surrounding community, as the town developed into a hub of sporting activity. Both the Middleburg Hunt and Orange County Hunt worked to develop their foxhunting territories, building up relationships with landowners and replacing barbed wire fencing with stone walls and chicken coop jumps.

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Unidentified Photo. National Sporting Library & Museum, Archives Collection, MC0033, “Middleburg-Leesburg Photograph Album.”

Eager sportsmen from urban centers in the northeast began migrating to Middleburg to enjoy sports that were being crowded out by expanded development. Seasonal visitors took the Southern Railway train line from the nation’s capital to The Plains before trekking on horses or on wagons to Middleburg.

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Unidentified Photo. National Sporting Library & Museum, Archives Collection, MC0033, “Middleburg-Leesburg Photograph Album.”

Another image with advanced fading, this one of an unidentified woman wearing the unmistakable fashion of the 1920s.

The sporting tradition of Hunt Country lives on, and thousands of visitors still come to Middleburg in the hopes of experiencing the excitement of the world of equestrian sport. As these new audiences encounter these sports, the preservation element of NSLM’s mission makes it possible to promote and share these pieces of history.


Wedding Photography by Spiering Photography

John Connolly has served as the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2014. He is responsible for the care of the Library collections, including books, magazines, photographs, diaries, letters, and much more. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact John by e-mail

“This beautiful animal, which, so far as I can ascertain, has now entirely ceased to exist, and concerning which the strangest legends and traditions are afloat, was, I think it may be positively asserted, of Andalusian blood.”

Henry William Herbert (1807-1858) chronicled the state of all American things equine in his massive two-volume work, Frank Forester’s Horse and Horsemanship of the United States and British provinces of North America (1857). The subject in this chapter was the mysterious Narragansett Pacer, the first truly American breed of horse. Like many inventions in the colonial world, the breed was devised through necessity in environmental conditions that were unknown in Europe.

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Saddlebred Yearlings At Willowbank Farm In Simpsonville, KY by Heather Moreton from Louisville, KY, USA. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License, accessed via Wikimedia Commons.

Without a system of refined, easy roadways in America, colonial settlers were obliged to ride on horseback instead of using carriages. Riding horseback long distances could be brutally jarring, and it wasn’t long before colonists began looking for a horse with a smoother, more comfortable gait. The result was the Narragansett Pacer, named for the Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island. The breed emerged in mystery, including several wild legends detailed by Herbert:

“The legends, to which I allude, tell in two wise; or rather, I should say, there are only two versions of the same legend. One saying that the original stallion, whence came the breed, was picked up at sea, swimming for his life, no one knew whence or whither; and was so carried in by his salvors to the Providence Plantations; the other, evidently another form of the same story, stating that the same original progenitor was discovered running wild in the woods of Rhode Island.” Frank Forester’s Horse and Horsemanship of the United States and British provinces of North America (1857), volume II, page 67.

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Illustration from Frank Forester’s Horse and Horsemanship of the United States and British Provinces of North America (1857). National Sporting Library & Museum, acquired 1981, the gift of Mrs. William Pyemont.

Fanciful legends aside, it’s most likely that the Pacer was the product of import of Spanish, Irish, and British stock throughout the 17th Century and into the early 18th Century. Like several older European and Asian breeds, the Pacer’s feet of one side moved one after the other. This proved to be far more comfortable than a pounding four-time walk for riders spending hours in the saddle.

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American Saddlebred Bathing (2008). Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License, accessed via Wikimedia Commons.

In the 1700s, the Pacer became the most popular breed in the American colonies and the fledgling United States. Good Pacers were sought for riding and racing alike, and George Washington owned several. According to legend, when Paul Revere embarked on his famous midnight ride, it was aboard a Narragansett Pacer.

Unfortunately, by the 1880s (and likely long before then) the Narragansett Pacer had gone extinct as a breed. In many ways, the breed was a victim of its own success. Pacers were heavily exported to the Caribbean in the 19th Century. The Pacer was also aggressively cross-bred with other breeds, leading to the demise of the original breed, but also making Pacers a major contributor to a new breed, the American Saddlebred. Although the Narragansett Pacer has been gone for over 140 years, its influence lives on in the many American breeds derived from it.


Wedding Photography by Spiering Photography

John Connolly has served as the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2014. He is responsible for the care of the Library collections, including books, magazines, photographs, diaries, letters, and much more. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact John by e-mail

The auction had gotten a little out of hand, and most of the blame could be laid at the feet of George Lambton. Lambton (1860-1945) was a former officer in the British infantry, and a former amateur steeplechase jockey (a role in which he won the prestigious Grand Steeple-Chase de Paris in 1888). After a serious fall, he had turned to training racehorses, and was generally considered one of the finest trainers of his day. Today, however, Lambton was waging a bidding war on William Tatem, Baron Glanely. Lord Glanely was a hugely successful racehorse breeder between the World Wars. By the time the Yearling Sales were held at Doncaster in September of 1921, Lord Glanely had already won the Epsom Derby and was eager for new turf conquests.

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Left: “Lord Glanely, 1921.” Accessed via Wikimedia Commons. Right: The Hon. George Lambton, from the painting by Lynwood Palmer.” Frontispiece to Men and Horses I Have Known, J. A. Allen & Co., 1963, National Sporting Library & Museum.

Both men sought to purchase a beautiful chestnut filly of sound pedigree and attractive conformation named Teresina. Bidding had started at the hefty sum of 1,000 guineas and had risen quickly into staggering totals. 5,000 guineas. 6,000 guineas. 7,000 guineas! Lord Glaneley topped Lambton with a bid of 7,600 guineas, to be outbid immediately by Lambton at 7,700. It was at this price that the auctioneer, the esteemed Somerville Tattersall, would ultimately award the filly to Lambton.

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“Teresina,” by Lionel Edwards. From The Aga Khan’s Horses, by R. C. Lyle, 1938. National Sporting Library & Museum, the gift of Edmund S. Twining, 1993.

Lambton wasn’t bidding for himself. Earlier in 1921, he had received a request to meet in London with Sultan Muhammed Shah, the Aga Khan. The Aga Khan (1877-1957) had been urged by his friend, Baron Wavertree, to enter the Thoroughbred horse breeding world back in 1904. The Aga Khan was of the opinion that if a horse breeding enterprise was to be founded, it should be done properly. He had waited, opting to focus on his political and religious responsibilities instead. But by 1921, he was ready to build his stable. He met with Lambton in London, attempting to woo him away from the Earl of Derby as a trainer. Unable to persuade Lambton to train his horses, the Aga Khan had engaged him as his agent to purchase the horses to begin his new racing stable.

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“Painting Teresina — The Foal Who Would Be In” by Lionel Edwards. From The Aga Khan’s Horses, by R. C. Lyle, 1938. National Sporting Library & Museum, the gift of Edmund S. Twining, 1993.

The Aga Khan’s instructions were simple enough: focus on mares and fillies, only purchase colts when they showed significant promise. When the Yearling Sales arrived, Lambton was determined to find the very best bloodstock for the Aga Khan. A brown filly named Cos was purchased by Lambton for 5,000 guineas, and by the time Lambton left the sales he had purchased eight horses for a total of 24,520 guineas. The tally would make up about 14 percent of the total for the entire sale.

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Signature page from The Aga Khan’s Horses, by R. C. Lyle, 1938. National Sporting Library & Museum, the gift of Edmund S. Twining, 1993. R. C. Lyle, Lionel Edwards, and the Aga Khan all signed the 140 copies in this book’s first edition.

It was a promising beginning for the Aga Khan’s stable. Teresina established herself as a horse with exemplary stamina, and after three years of racing and a victory at the Jockey Club Stakes, was retired from racing. In 1922, Lambton purchased Mumtaz Mahal, a dashing gray filly with blinding speed. She would go on to be one of the most successful two-year-olds in the history of flat racing. By 1924, the Aga Khan was the leading owner, with 11 winners and over 44,000 pounds won that year. The Aga Khan would go on to become one of the most decorated racehorse owners and breeders of the early 20th Century. He’s still the only owner to have won the Derby five times and would be named a British Champion Owner thirteen times.


Wedding Photography by Spiering Photography

John Connolly has served as the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2014. He is responsible for the care of the Library collections, including books, magazines, photographs, diaries, letters, and much more. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact John by e-mail

The Library’s Main Reading Room has two reading alcoves, and the one near the front gets most attention from our visitors. As they browse through, it’s not uncommon for some of the items shelved there to receive a chuckle.

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Badminton Magazine. Many guests to NSLM find this title a little confusing.

What’s Badminton Magazine, you may ask? And does NSLM really have two decades of periodicals on rackets and shuttlecocks? To get at the answer, we have to look back a good long way into history.

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Portrait of Henry Somerset, 5th Duke of Beaufort (1744-1803). Accessed via Wikimedia Commons. The Fifth Duke of Beaufort founded The Duke of Beaufort’s Hunt.

The history of Badminton Magazine truly starts in 1762, when exhausted after a fruitless day of hunting deer, Henry Somerset, the Fifth Duke of Beaufort decided to try hunting fox for a change. The hunting must have gone much better, for the Duke continued on hunting, establishing the Duke of Beaufort’s Hunt, one of the oldest fox hunts in the world. The Dukes of Beaufort have continued to hunt fox with the pack every since, each Duke typically serving as the Master in his turn. Over the years, the family has become one of the truly great sporting families in British history.

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“Over an Obstacle By Himself,” by G. D. Giles. Illustration from The Badminton Library: Riding (1891). National Sporting Library & Museum.

Between 1885 and 1902, Longmans, Green & Company produced a series of encyclopedic books covering the whole spectrum of British sports and pastimes. The series was the brainchild of Henry Somerset, the Eight Duke of Beaufort. Wishing to equip neophytes with the basics on sporting topics the Duke served as the initial overseeing editor for a series that would ultimately swell to include 30 volumes on horse racing, hunting, fishing, polo, falconry, golf, cricket, punting, and even dancing. The book series was titled The Badminton Library.

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The Badminton Library continued to add volumes after the death of the Eighth Duke of Beaufort in 1899, adding a total of 30 volumes by 1920.

The success of The Badminton Library became evident to the publishers early, and by 1885 the Badminton Magazine of Sport and Pastimes had been established. It ran from 1895 to 1923, and covered the same wide variety of sports in The Badminton Library: shooting, foxhunting, fishing, and falconry are blended with yachting, sprinting, and golf. And that’s why we have Badminton Magazine in the Library.

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A page from a 1902 issue of Badminton Magazine with photographs of foxhunting, sprinting, and yachting in a variety of British localities.

Why the name Badminton? It only seemed natural. The Somerset family has resided at Badminton House since 1612, and it has since served as the principal seat of the Dukes of Beaufort. For unclear reasons, the mansion has also given its name to the sport of badminton. The house’s oral legends claim that the Eight Duke of Beaufort’s children invented the game during a long, dreary winter in 1863. Ostensibly, it was a safe game to play indoors without fear of damaging the equestrian paintings by John Wooton in the hall.

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“Badminton House,” from the Preface to The Badminton Library: Riding (1890). National Sporting Library & Museum.

Historians indicate that badminton was likely played earlier in India before being brought back to England by the military in the 1870s. But Badminton House’s name stuck to the sport as it developed and established itself in the 1880s and beyond.


Wedding Photography by Spiering Photography

John Connolly has served as the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian at the National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) since early 2014. He is responsible for the care of the Library collections, including books, magazines, photographs, diaries, letters, and much more. The NSLM collections span over 350 years of the history of equestrian sport, as well as fly fishing, wing shooting, and other field sports. Have a question? Contact John by e-mail