On Scent: Andre Pater and the Iroquois Hunt Club

As the story goes, contemporary sporting artist Andre Pater (pronounced “potter”) made a fateful wrong turn towards Paris, Kentucky, on the way to a meeting and experienced the beauty of the scenic thoroughbred farms in the pastoral region for the first time.  In 1988, he and his wife, Kasia, moved from Dallas, Texas, and have made the Kentucky Bluegrass their home ever since.

Before moving to the U.S., Pater received a formal academic art education, earning a Masters degree in Interior Architecture from the Kraków Academy of Fine Arts in his native Poland. There, he honed his skills in drawing and in easel-painting nudes. The artist, however, was fascinated by Arabian horses from an early age and taught himself to draw and paint animals. Direct observations from nature and study of previous Polish and sporting art masters fueled his creativity and exploration of different techniques.

The Meet
The Meet (Hilary J. Boone, Jr. and Hilary J. Boone, III), 1991, oil on canvas, 25 x 30 inches, Private Collection © Andre Pater

In Kentucky, the Paters first lived at Wimbledon Farm, the property of Hilary Boone, II, President of the Iroquois Hunt Club. It is here that Pater first began to artistically explore foxhunting along with the other sporting and animal subjects for which he has gained prominence. He persuaded Boone to sit for a sporting portrait along with his son, Hilary Boone, III, surrounded by the Iroquois pack in 1991. (Ironically, Boone, III, a polo player, first took up hunting seriously after the painting was completed.)

Pater’s growing success led to a rising tide of commissions and the need for a larger studio. He found one on the property of Penny Chenery, owner of the 1973 Triple Crown Winner Secretariat. The expansive space gave the artist the freedom to paint on a grander scale, and among these larger canvases were paintings of hounds.

Hounds in a Kennel
Hounds in a Kennel, 1995, oil on canvas, 28 x 32 inches, Private Collection © Andre Pater

Fully immersed in Kentucky country life, the Paters became social members of the Iroquois, and the artist gained unrestricted access to the kennels. Foxhunting and hounds subjects became an inspiration throughout his career.

One cannot help but be captivated by the individual personalities, anatomical accuracy, and physical movement that Pater is able to convey in his portrayals of hounds, figures, and other animals.  His mastery in capturing the characteristics of light and shadow with a painterly effect draws the viewer into the compositions. Pater paints his subjects from the inside out.

Heading Home, 1994, oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches, Private Collection © Andre Pater

… and to think it all began with a wrong turn. The Paters’ involvement with the Iroquois has continued to the present. Kasia serves on the hunt club’s Board, and Pater has supported the Hound Welfare Fund – a program for Iroquois hounds retired due to age, illness, or injury – by donating limited edition prints and chalk drawings auctioned at the annual fundraiser in June.

Awake, 2011, charcoal on paper, 33 x 37 inches, Private Collection © Andre Pater

On Saturday, May 27, in celebration of Virginia Foxhound Show weekend, Andre Pater will return to the National Sporting Library & Museum to discuss several of his foxhunting and hound paintings and drawings in the exhibition, Andre Pater: In a Sporting Light, on view through August 13. The talk will be followed by a reception and lecture on the Hound Welfare Fund by Lilla Mason, MFH of Iroquois Hunt Club. For more information on the programs and to RSVP, please visit Nationalsporting.org.


pfeifferClaudia Pfeiffer has been the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Curator of Art at the National Sporting Library & Museum since the position was underwritten by the George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Foundation in 2012. Her primary focus is the research, design, interpretation, writing, and installation of exhibitions. E-mail Claudia at cpfeiffer@nationalsporting.org

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