Tableau of the Procession at the Queen’s Coronation, 1838

As far back as the early 16th Century, horses served an important ceremonial role in the political and social life throughout Europe. In addition to satisfying the basic needs of transportation in civil and military life, the ability to ride became an essential mark of the nobility. So strong was the link, royal displays of horses and carriages in processional pageants became a staple of social life that can still be seen sometimes today.

These pageants were more than symbols of aristocratic power; they were a public spectacle and people of all stations flocked to view them.

Tableau of the Procession at the Coronation of Queen Victoria. Gift of John and Martha Daniels, 1999.
Tableau of the Procession at the Coronation of Queen Victoria. Gift of John and Martha Daniels, 1999.

Today’s highlight is a bound panorama that was printed to commemorate the coronation procession of Queen Victoria in 1838. The panorama was printed and folded into a booklet to give the impression of seeing the great procession.

"Captain General of the Royal Archers," and "Her Majesty's State Carriage."
“Captain General of the Royal Archers,” and “Her Majesty’s State Carriage.”

Panoramas were made popular by the painter Robert Barker, who began producing them in the late 18th Century.

Senior Econ &c," "Yeomen of the Guard," and "Junior Exons."
Senior Econ &c,” “Yeomen of the Guard,” and “Junior Exons.”

Barker eventually constructed a building to view panoramas in Leicester Square in London, and similar exhibitions spread throughout Europe through the 18th Century.

"Deputy Adjutant General &c."
“Deputy Adjutant General &c.”

This volume folds the pages back and forth; the image is continuous from page to page. NSLM has several other similar panoramas in the F. Ambrose Clark Rare Book Room, but they are all rolled into a scroll casing.

"Queen's Household."
“Queen’s Household.”

The grandeur of the horses and carriages, as well as the number of servants, guards, and attendants (all in matching livery), publicly showcased the power and grace of the English monarchy. We could only fit a few images here on the blog. Panoramas have been the subject of our weekly Gallery Talks, so if you have a chance please stop by the Library at 2:00 p.m. on Wednesdays to see the rest!

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