École Impériale de Cavalerie, 1869

Today’s highlight from the Library collections is big. Literally!

Caution. Objects in Rare Book Room may be larger than they appear. Hand placed for scale
Caution. Objects in Rare Book Room may be larger than they appear. Hand placed to establish scale.

This mammoth tome’s spine measures over 28 inches. That’s more than enough to stagger your humble servant, the Librarian. The book is a commemorative piece containing prints depicting exercises at École Impériale de Cavalerie, the French riding school. It was edited by Javaud, and I can’t locate an entry crediting the artist who did the paintings, though the artist’s signature (though illegible) is on almost all of them. The book begins with a brief essay on the history and structure of the school.

École Impériale de Cavalerie was purchased by NSLM at auction in April 2013 via a generous grant from the B.H. Breslauer Foundation.
École Impériale de Cavalerie was purchased by NSLM at auction in April 2013 via a generous grant from the
B.H. Breslauer Foundation.
The school was founded in the early 19th Century by Louis XVIII. Today it is an Armoured Cavalry school.
The École Impériale de Cavalerie is the traditional French riding school, located at Saumur in the Loire region of France. It was founded in the early 19th Century by Louis XVIII. Today it is an Armoured Cavalry training school.
cadre
Much like the Spanish Riding School of Vienna, Saumur was a center of the classical horsemanship to which dressage can trace its roots. The French influence on dressage has a long history, and includes luminaries such as
François Robichon de La Guérinière.
Saumur is the home of the Cadre Noir
Saumur is the home of the Cadre Noir, the instructors in horsemanship at the
École Impériale de Cavalerie.
A member of the Cadre Noir performs a jumping display over a single upright pole.
A member of the Cadre Noir performs a jumping display over a single upright pole. Source
The goal of classical military horsemanship is to attain complete unity between the horse and the rider. Exercises were developed to test the skill, concentration, and athleticism of both.
The goal of classical military horsemanship is to attain complete unity between the horse and the rider. Exercises were developed to test the skill, concentration, and athleticism of both.
Today the Cadre Noir demonstrates the riding styles of the 16th and 17th Century, keeping traditional horsemanship alive.
Vicomte D’Aure was a riding instructor at Saumur in the 1840s and 1850s. He championed the use of jumping to aid in training. He was also a spirited opponent of the dressage methods of
François Baucher.
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